Monday, March 7, 2011

How To Make Acoustic Panels

Yesterday's post on how to improve the sound of your room received such a great response that I thought we'd continue on the subject today. In that post, I wrote about how you could substantially improve the sound of any room by building a reflection free zone (RFZ) around your listening position. This is most easily done by using acoustic panels, and today we'll show you just how to build one.

This is an excerpt from the DVD that accompanies The Studio Builder's Handbook (co-written with my buddy, engineer Dennis Moody). There are actually a few variations on how to build these panels, but you'll just see the basic one here.

To read excerpts from the book, go to the The Studio Builder's Handbook page on my website.



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7 comments:

Tony said...

If only I could find/buy this book in the UK!!

Anonymous said...

I'm sorry but I had to laugh when I saw the bandaid on the finger. Then he went on to holding the wood together with his fingers while he drilled. I don't mean to be critical but corner clamps are cheaper to buy than going to the hospital for stitches. Another way to do it is install the corner bracket on one piece of wood and using it to hold the other piece of wood in place while you either insert screws or drill your holes safely keeping you hand away from where the bit will go if you slip. It is very easy for a drill bit or a drywall bit to go where you don't want it to. I hope the guy isn't a guitar player.

acoustical sound panels said...

Thanks of your information,i have read it is very helpful for me.

acoustical sound panels said...

excellent information ! it was really helpful to me thank you so much

Jeff Nietch said...

Great video. I've made similar sound absorbing panels for my home theater. I had a friend hold a handheld mirror on the walls to help locate the reflection points. When you can see the speaker from your sitting position, mark it with tape and that's where the panel should go. Worked like a charm.

Jeff Nietch said...

Great video. I've made similar sound absorbing panels for my home theater. I had a friend hold a handheld mirror on the walls to help locate the reflection points. When you can see the speaker from your sitting position, mark it with tape and that's where the panel should go. Worked like a charm.

David said...

your acoustic panels look great Bobby. The rigid rockwool I think is much better to use than the rigid fiberglass.

Cheers!

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