Monday, August 1, 2011

The Who "Who Are You" Isolated Vocals

We all love to hear inside of a hit, regardless of whether it's on the charts now or from 50 years ago. Here's a look at the vocal track from The Who's hit "Who Are You" that shows us just how good Roger Daltry and crowd sang together as a band.

What's interesting is that the first half of the harmony vocal phrase isn't there except for the beginning of the song. That suggests that either it's on another track or whoever was doing this mix wasn't putting it on purpose so we could hear the lead vocal clearly.

Also it's interesting to hear the distortion on the lead vocal, especially towards the end, and the fact that a the three part harmony breaks down to two on the outro.



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9 comments:

André said...

Remakable ambience (plate?) on these vocal takes. I wonder how standard it was to record vocals with reverb in those days. Either way, it works.

CaptainVictory said...

Who the "hell" are you? I thought he used the "F" word there.

Ronoh55 said...

@CaptainVictory Yes he does use the "F" word there. This is either a different take (most likely) Or someone who sounds amazingly like Roger Daltry.

Anonymous said...

I'd like to know what that "reverb" treatment was on the vocal. Was this done with an effect or an acoustic environment?

Bobby Owsinski said...

According to Jon Astley, who mixed the album, the version we all know was mixed at CTS, which had plates.

Bobby Owsinski said...

This cut is the cleaned-up radio version.

Anonymous said...

Hmm.. Plates huh. It sounds like a bright small room on the lead vocal - can a plate be made to sound like that?

Whatever it is i like it. It's great to be able to hear it in isolation. Thanks.

nielzer said...

I can't comment as fact, since I wasn't there, but I am pretty confident we are hearing the combination of plate reverb, a bit of chorusing, a very short delay, and a bit of shifting via the Eventide H910 - a fairly standard vocal treatment for the late 70's rock and roll vox.

Greg said...

I agree with nielzer. Several things are making that vocal effect. The plate is the natural sounding part.

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