Take Your Mixes To The Next Level

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

14 Studio Etiquette Tips

Recording Session image
Knowing the proper etiquette while recording is almost as important as doing your gig. If you make people uncomfortable or do something that's considered out of place and chances are that you won't be asked back.



Let's look at the way everyone expects you to act during the session with these 14 points taken from The Studio Musician's Handbook. Most of them apply to just about everyone on a session.
"1. If there’s creative dialogue with the artist, songwriter, producer or engineer, make sure that your opinions are wanted and warranted before you offer them. 
2. Be careful about musical references. You may think that the track you’re working on is great because it reminds you of Dusty Springfield’s classic “Son of a Preacher Man” only to find out upon your mention of it that it’s on the artist’s “Ten Most Overrated Songs” list. 
3. Whether you’re on your own or part of an ensemble, focus on your work first. If you have input for other players, make sure it’s warranted and you can actually help them out. Players often tweak each other’s parts or help one another to understand a written passage, remember a song’s form, or get a sound. 
4. Remember – always defer to whoever is in charge. That person is usually the producer, but you may be receiving guidance or input from a musical director, the artist, or the engineer. 
5. Keep an open mind. Greet suggestions with willingness and always respond positively. If you’re receiving input from more than one source and they contradict one another, diplomatically point that out and let them resolve it. 
6. And don’t forget – if you can’t keep your cell phone outside the studio, TURN IT OFF (not just on vibrate - that’s a distraction too). 
7. Put away the magazines, computers, iPhones, and anything else that can be a distraction. The last thing a producer wants to see is you updating your Facebook status in between takes! 
8. If you need time to check your messages or Facebook, make sure you ask first. Most sessions have timed or natural breaks when you can meet you individual needs, but be sure to always ask if you wish to leave the recording environment while there’s work being done, even if you’re not directly involved at that moment. 
9. Your behavior should always be positive, and you should strive to be “present for the moment.” 
10. There’s a time and a place for everything, but sometimes cajoling, goofing around or humor doesn’t belong at a session. Then on another day with the same people, the session may be all about the gags and laughs. Studio pro’s know how to “go with the flow” and are experts at reading people and situations. 
11. If people are conversing, treat the session like any other workplace and try to avoid potential conversational “hot spots”: politics, religion, family and money. 
12. Everyone likes a good conversation and a funny joke, but it’s best not to risk being misinterpreted or misperceived as offensive. 
13. Earn and honor rank. That means if there are players on the session with more professional or personal history with the artist or producer than you have accumulated, let them lead. Everyone benefits when everyone gets along and knows their place 
14. Always wait until the job is done before you ask the powers that be if they are open to your creativity. It’s appropriate to do so before you offer your ideas. Always ask first if they are open to your input. If so, and you hear it in your imagination, let them know."
 The best way to endear yourself to everyone on a recording session is to act like a pro. Follow these 14 etiquette tips, and you'll encounter very few problems along the way. What are your tips?

To read additional excerpts from The Studio Musician's Handbook and my other books, check out the excerpts section of bobbyowsinski.com.

1 comment:

heratik said...

Some good common sense stuff here, but #'s 3 - 5 kind of struck a chord with me. It's irritating to get into a power struggle (especially when you're on the clock), whether it's with performers or producers. Having a systematic way of handling disagreements is a killer concept that should be shared with everyone before even stepping foot in the studio.

Kind of related, I was wearing the producer hat a couple weeks ago and I had a fairly awkward studio session with a lovely female vocalist. So as somewhat of a reminder to myself of how to better treat my talent, I did a write-up on how to easing studio awkwardness. No spam intended...just seems like a good companion article. Check it out here if you're interested: http://bit.ly/awkwardstudio

Thanks for the studio pointers, Bobby!

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